Guess who’s running for higher office?

By Heidi Zemach for SCN –

Seward Mayor David Seaward tells SCN he will not run again while attending a community dinner welcoming the Obihiro exchange visitors Tuesday night. Heidi Zemach photo.

Seward Mayor David Seaward file photo telling SCN he will not run for City Mayor again, while attending a community dinner welcoming the Obihiro exchange visitors. Heidi Zemach photo.

Former Seward City Mayor David Seaward says he is running for U.S. Congress on the Republican ticket against U.S. Congressman Don Young. Young is serving his 21st term as Alaska’s representative to the U.S. House of Representatives. He’s its 1st ranking Republican member, and the 4th ranking overall member of the House of Representatives.

“I am an Old School. I believe in hard work, respect for life, respect for others and help one another whenever possible,” Seaward said on his Facebook page.

He currently works as a security guard for Doyon, in Anchorage.

Seaward outlines his candidacy and some of his positions on his Facebook page.  https://www.facebook.com/davidseaward10

Touting his own government experience as Seward’s mayor, and its potential for positive economic growth, Seaward’s top national issues include gun rights, which he believes are being eroded, personal freedoms (from governmental wiretapping), federal government “overreach,” and he favors further restrictions on abortion rights. Seaward asks voters to stand with him to stop “big corporate welfare” and tax loopholes. He slams the Affordable Health Care Act as harming the 85 percent who already had insurance, and calls out President Barak Obama for saying how proud he was to serve on the Veterans Affairs Committee as a junior senator. He also calls out Bernie Sanders of Vermont for defending the Veteran’s Administration scandal.



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Seaward’s term as mayor, and his relationship with the city manager and majority of other council members was rocky and conflict-ridden almost from day-one, when he replaced Mayor Willard Dunham in an election more about people’s opposition to proposed “sin taxes” on alcohol and tobacco than about the two candidates’ positions on issues or character. In fact there was practically no campaign at all by either one.

Not long into office, Seaward was officially sanctioned by the council for allegedly promoting his own support for the Jesse Lee Home renovation project while in Juneau, which was not on the city’s capital improvements priority list. It was seen as potentially taking away from things considered to have a higher priority. Under the terms of the sanction, he was forbidden for a period of time from travelling from Seward on city business, or speaking to higher public officials. Seaward questioned established council policy frequently, often raising conflict of interest concerns that he defined more broadly than most of the others on council did.

The mayor frequently did attempt to speak out, and make proposals on behalf of Seward’s under-privileged or less-represented populations, including small business, the poor, the homeless, and the disabled community, and the recreational needs of children.

Obihiro Mayor Norihisa Yonezawa presents Seward City Mayor David Seaward with ceremonial kimono and fan, a gift for the sister-city. Heidi Zemach photo.

Obihiro Mayor Norihisa Yonezawa presents Seward City Mayor David Seaward with ceremonial kimono and fan, a gift for the sister-city. Heidi Zemach photo.

His high point, or the one in which he took the most satisfaction, was probably Seaward’s trip to Obihiro, Japan, as part of a Seward delegation to that sister-city, where he, and the visitors were treated like royalty, and the Obihiro delegation’s trip to Seward.

Seaward’s campaign manager is Robert Eubank.

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  1. Pingback: Guess who’s running for higher office? – Sewardcity News | TAKE BACK THE MAJORITY

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